Oh many of my Italian and Spanish friends will like this too – so I must share this one. You could use wheat or barley instead for a nuttier taste. I’m sure my grandmother knew how to make such a pudding – the English were very fond of foods from all the countries they invaded – :) For some reason I am polenta challenged but I will check this one out soon. Thanks Laurie.

A Taste of Morning

Indian Pudding is a traditional New England dessert which can be traced back to the 18th century. I developed a  fondness for it when I lived in the Boston area. For some reason, though, it is relatively unknown outside of New England.

Here is a brief history of the dish …

When British settlers moved to this country they brought their Hasty Pudding recipes with them. I’ve never had Hasty Pudding, but apparently it is a dish made from wheat cooked in water or milk until it develops the consistency of a porridge. Wheat was in short supply in New England, so the settlers adapted to the new world by substituting corn meal – which they called Indian flour. Being along a trade route with plentiful molasses and spices, they embellished the dish with these flavorful additions as well as with dried fruits and sometimes nuts … and thankfully, the…

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Holiday Visits

I was up at the farm on Christmas Eve to celebrate with my mother and brother, along with my husband and son.  My other brother and his family [4 of his kids and their families = a lot of people] were visiting the next day – and due to multiple flu victims, they didn’t drop by to say hello to us.  So it was a quiet and fun evening , just the 5 of us.  Then you have to consider the pets.  Adam, my mother’s collie was very happy to see us and get started on the duck dinner.  My chihuahua, Dali, was in great form as well.  I had her traveling case beside me to discourage her from climbing the furniture.  Adam kept her company, under my mother’s wheel chair.  He has used this space since he was a pup.

Adam in his special spot

Adam in his special spot

Where do You Look?

Do you look ahead or to the side or just watch where your feet are stepping?  Should you look directly at anyone and feel OK about a direct look?  Do you know when is it good or bad form?  Some of these questions hit me in the elevator last week.   I’ve debated this before.   Of course the variables change and so do the rules.  What interests me most are the checks we live with – personal rules and social protocol.

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family – no flash – lots of movement

Last week – There was this girl who stepped into the elevator and faced perpendicular to me.  I could see out of the corner of my eye, that she was short, 20 something with long, straight, dark blond hair held back with an Alice band.  Her face was long and pale.  The band wasn’t able to hold the hair well and the cotton shapeless outfit spelled youth, arts student and earth child.  She gazed up at me, to ask me something.  Normally people are not so direct.  I’m not too comfortable with gazing although I am very good at looking.  I noticed her eyes were open really wide and they looked directly at me as I talked.

I only managed a few seconds of returned gaze.  I wasn’t able to keep my thoughts together under this gaze.  The intensity was startling.   The 1st issue was because of this internal running commentary going on about looking at people and secondly it was about participating in her reality.  It was too personal.   I chose to look sideways.  Unfortunately I started to laugh at myself but she interpreted it more with what I was saying and the conversation was lightened.   I think I saw amusement being sent back at me, as she noted my off-center gaze.  Perhaps she too has the same internal conversation.

Through a certain amount of personal shyness I am sure I have rarely looked anyone in the eye, most of my days.  Contrarily,  I am also a starer.  As an artist I stare very intently.  My husband and friends, in our early acquaintance, found those stares a bit uncomfortable.  Our art class model used to comment on my stares.  I stare at all sorts of things when I’m listening or looking.

Some days I become very bold and just stare – however it isn’t without risk.  I once was shouted at – “What do you think you are looking at?!!” by a very large person.  I thought it was obvious and even though she was alarming in her reaction, I found the situation very funny.  Perhaps it was rude but in all truth I was having a great old time looking at her, watching her walk towards me.  I wasn’t critical, I was just looking.  When I was a young person I often walked along looking at the ground!  When I traveled to and lived for a bit  in California that all fell away – thankfully.  It was unexpected – nowhere else had that effect on me.

As an artist I look at everything.   Colour, shapes, movement, negative space – they are all food for thought.  One of my most common looking strategies is when I let the visual image come in uncensored.  This is a distancing strategy.  I manage to look without engaging in details.  My work is very detail oriented and critical in nature.  It can be that work  and the social looking are not always played  properly.   They can be misinterpreted in kind.

In the end I will continue to look and monitor my behavior.  Looking is fun and maybe a bit dangerous.  The alternative is too depressing.2012-6-1-BowlCrpdRszd

Hoar Frost

I was up at the farm last weekend and the Hoar Frost was amazing.  I was so happy I had the camera with me.  Initially it seemed a waste because it was such a grey day.  It got greyer as I drove up the escarpment.  There is often a 3 to 10 degree difference from the city to the country, where the farm is. When I get to the farm there could be black ice and snow.

Alongside the road, the woods and farms looked spooky in the fog.  By the time I turned off the highway the temperature had plummeted to create the hoar-frost.  Our car has a  temp read-out of the ground.  It was +2C in town,  0C on the highway and -5C on the side road.

Trees on Roadway - Frosted

Trees on Roadway – Frosted

Old Maples

Old Maples

Hay Field

Hay Field

Lane entrance

Lane entrance

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Hoar Frost

Hoar Frost

In the photos with the ‘fog’ – the frost is disappearing into the air – this was over so quickly – I am glad I wasn’t late for lunch. . Once at the farm I bundled up my Chihuahua and took her and my parent’s collie for a walk.  Dali always has a good time but damp cold and snow aren’t a Chihuahua’s favourite.  When we turned around to walk home she was charged and that excited Adam the collie – who in turn hoped they would play.  Dali was up for a race but not a wrestle!

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Play!

Play!

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